Art Markets and the Future of Collecting | Data limite: 28 de Fevereiro

Loughborough University, June 15, 2018.

This symposium investigates the impact of art markets on museum collecting and contemporary curatorial practices.
As sponsorship deals and commercial interests increasingly shape the global footprint of museum ‘brands’ and determine the budget for exhibitions, new questions arise as to the social responsibilities of public art institutions, their independence, and the evolving narratives proposed by their collections.

In the wake of cuts to state funding for the arts, have public museums become reliant on the financial support and, hence, personal tastes of private donors?
To what extent do exhibition practices track the market activities of auction houses and private galleries and with what impact on institutional diversity and the career prospects of individual artists?
Are privately owned spaces and commercial venues supplanting state-funded museums?
Has increasing public interest in the spectacle of the art market altered expectations about the kinds of experience that should be promoted by museums?

Proposals for 20 minute papers are welcome that debate intersections between local or global art market forces and museum collecting in the twenty-first century. We welcome proposals that address cases from around the world.

This symposium is sponsored by the Museums, Markets, and Critical Heritage Research Group of Loughborough University.

The Museums, Markets, and Critical Heritage Research Group is a forum for the exchange of ideas about art markets, exhibition histories, museums, and public and private collecting practices. Its research and events are open to individuals from all disciplinary backgrounds, and we aim to bring together scholars whose interests span diverse geographies and time periods.

The group seeks to build research collaborations within and beyond Loughborough University, to share knowledge, and to develop policies that impact on the cultural landscape. We aim to promote innovative thinking about the future of public and private collecting, access to the art market, the stewardship of cultural property, and the relationship between museums and their stakeholders. To that end, we welcome contributions to, and participation in, our visiting speaker programme and symposia by museum professionals and scholars with interests in trends that shape markets, exhibition practices, and public heritage policies.